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How To Make Dinosaur Egg Bath Bombs for Kids



My nephew is wild about dinosaurs. He can probably name every dinosaur ever in existence, even those I've never heard of before. It's amazing.

So, I thought for a fun gift , I'd make him something special -- real live dinosaur eggs. OK, so they aren't real dinosaur eggs but they sure look like they could be.

They're actually egg-shaped bath bombs. And if you have any tiny humans on your gift list, this is an super fun idea that I guarantee they'll love.

What's special about these bath bombs is the little dinosaur toy hidden inside. Drop one into the tub and while the bath bomb fizzes the kids get to watch the dinosaur "hatch." They also turn the bath water a cool color, and what kid wouldn't like that? Super fun!

These bath bombs use plastic eggs as the mold. Fair warning, it takes a bit of practice to perfect the molding and unmolding of the bath bombs, so I really suggest making a practice batch first to try your hand at it. That said, once you get it bath bomb making is super fun!

Ready to try it?

Dinosaur Egg Bath Bombs

This recipe makes 2 bath bombs using a 3 inch length plastic egg
 

Here's what you'll need:

 1 cup baking soda
1/2 cup citric acid
1 tablespoon kaolin clay
1 teaspoon sweet almond oil
Yellow food coloring
Blue food coloring
Spritz bottle full of witch hazel
1 large plastic egg to use as a mold
2 small plastic dinosaurs
2 small bowls
Gloves

Step 1: Measure out the baking soda, citric acid, and kaolin clay in a bowl and mix well. If there are any clumps, break them apart so your mixture is nice and smooth.

Step 2: Stir in the sweet almond oil and mix until it's completely incorporated. 

Step 3: Divide the dry mixture into two bowls of equal portions. Now's the time to put on your gloves if you haven't already! This mixture is hard on manicures, and the colorants will definitely stain your hands (but don't worry, once they're in bath bomb form they won't stain the kids soaking in the tub!)

Work with one bowl at a time. Add 10 drops of yellow food coloring to the first bowl, stirring quickly between drops. The colorant will clump up in the mixture, so you'll have to get in with your hands.  Rub the colorant into the dry mixture until it's completely mixed in. Once the yellow mixture is blended, add blue food coloring to the second bowl.

Clumpy color in the mixture. That's OK, just don your gloves.
Rub the colorants into the mixture with your fingers.
Color, nicely mixed.
Step 4: Work one bowl at a time. Spritz the yellow mixture with witch hazel, stirring well between spritzes, until the mixture becomes the consistency of wet sand.

It's key to get the right consistency otherwise your bath bombs will be difficult to mold. Too dry, and your bath bombs will crumble; too wet and they will grow and fizz out of the mold.

This is what you're looking for: when you squeeze the mixture in your hand it should hold together. If it crumbles apart, stir in a bit more witch hazel until it reaches this consistency. 

If your mixture becomes sticky, gooey, foamy, or it's fizzing, you've gotten it too wet. You may be able to save it by quickly adding 1/2 cup baking soda and 1/4 cup citric acid.

Once the yellow mixture is at the right consistency, work with the blue bowl.

This is the perfect consistency -- it holds together and doesn't crumble.
Step 5: Time to mold your bath bombs! Do one last check to make sure your mixture clumps together when you squeeze it in your hand. The first bowl often dries out a bit while you're making your second.

Grab a bit of yellow and press it into one side of the egg mold. Grab a bit of blue and do the same. You don't have to be too particular, because a random mottled look is what you're going for.

Continue to alternate between colors, pressing the mixture firmly into the mold. Place one toy dinosaur into the egg half and continue pressing the mixture in and around it. Slightly overfill the half.

Do the same to the other half of the egg, slightly overfilling. Press the two halves together firmly, twisting just a bit to set the two halves together. I like to let the bath bomb set in the mold for about 5 minutes undisturbed before unmolding.

 Press the mixture and toy firmly into one half of the egg. Dinosaur legs!
Do the same to the other half, overfilling both just slightly.
Press the two sides together firmly. The mold won't come together, that's OK.
Step 6: The exciting (if not nerve-wracking) part -- unmolding. Cup one half of the mold in your palm. Gently squeeze the side of the top mold, lifting it carefully off the bomb. Switch hands and do the same with the second half of the mold.

If the bath bomb crumbles or breaks while taking it out of the mold, all is not lost. Simple scoop it back into the bowl, add more witch hazel until it holds shape when squeezed, and try, try again.

Unmolded dinosaur egg bath bomb.

Oops, this one crumbled as I removed the mold. No biggie. Place back in the bowl, dampen with witch hazel and try again.
When you have your bomb successfully out of the mold, carefully set it on a sheet of wax paper to harden. Although it's tempting, try not to disturb your bath bomb for 24 hours to allow it to fully dry and strengthen, otherwise you might accidentally crumble your bomb.

Once completely dry, wrap in plastic wrap or seal in a plastic or cello bag to keep moisture from your bomb. To use, just drop into the water and watch it hatch!

Dinosaur eggs! Let 'em set 24 hours before packaging.
Help! It's not working!
It takes practice to perfect your technique. Here's a quick cheat sheet to help you troubleshoot.
 
Crumbling or not holding together in the mold? Your mixture is too dry. Try adding more witch hazel. 

Too squishy, growing out of the mold, or not holding the egg shape while drying? Your mixture is too wet. Next time, add only enough witch hazel to dampen the mixture.

Halves aren't sticking together? Probably your mixture is too dry, or you're not packing it together tightly enough.

Ready to throw your bath bomb across the room? The frustration is real. The two-half molds are the toughest to master. If you're just done with the stupid egg mold! try a silicon mold instead. 

Grab a silicon muffin sheet or silicon soap mold. Any shape is fine because who says dinosaur eggs were egg shaped. Has anyone every actually seen one? No? Then maybe dinosaur eggs were shaped like stars, or hearts, or cupcakes.

Press your bath bomb mixture into the mold with the toy dinosaur hidden in the middle. Flip the mold over onto wax paper or freezer paper and gently lift off. Let the bath bomb sit undisturbed for 24 hours. Admire those damned things, because they look good, don't they? Feel free to crush the egg molds.

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